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Jennifer Snowdon – United Kingdom

Jennifer Snowdon – United Kingdom

Jennifer Snowdon

Associate Director

Dept. Name
Europe Treasury Department
Entity — Country
Mizuho Bank — United Kingdom
Area(s) of Expertise/Experience
Foreign Exchange Sales
Active in Industry Since
2005
At Mizuho Since
2008
Undergraduate and/or Graduate School and/or Professional Qualifications
BA (Hons), Durham University

The need for honesty, transparency and trust are of upmost importance in the industry.

What do you do at Mizuho?

I started in relationship management for financial institutions. Then I moved to the Foreign Exchange Sales Desk, thereafter variously working with Japanese corporates, non-Japanese corporates, hedge funds and central banks to satisfy their foreign exchange and money market needs.

What has been your proudest moment/most rewarding experience while working at Mizuho?

Work for the London MEO with regards to the annual Central Bank Seminar, which he personally said met a high standard.

What do you do for fun outside work?

Cross–country skiing. In the summer and autumn months, I train in London on roller skis, occasionally getting out to mainland Europe to ski in snow tunnels before the real stuff falls. In winter and spring, I participate in ski marathons and am working towards becoming a Worldloppet Ski Federation Master.

What is the first thing you read every day (and why)?

Financial press, on the way to work, to give me an insight into market movements. Then once in the office, I read our internal Daily Yen Watch. Our economist’s piece gives a good round up of what has happened overnight in Japan and gives key focus points for the day ahead.

What is the most important thing you have learned while at Mizuho or in the industry?

The need for honesty, transparency and trust are of upmost importance in the industry, as evidenced by the way financial regulations have changed over the past few years.

Tell us about something you have learned from another culture.

Omotenashi. Whilst working on the Asian Winter Games and other international events for the Aomori Prefectural Government in a previous job, I learnt that omotenashi was at the heart of everything when dealing with dignitaries in Japan. It is the art of providing people with what they need, before they even know they need it, in a seamless and seemingly effortless way to ensure they never feel that they have burdened you. This has been priceless training for customer facing roles ever since.